Recent News
  • By Darwin Holmstrom | Photography by Tom Glatch

A Must Read! American Muscle Cars: A Full-Throttle History


This is the muscle car history to own -- a richly illustrated chronicle of America's greatest high-performance cars, told from their 1960s beginning through the present day!

When Ford got serious about its Total Performance program, it provided drag racers with a hot 406-cubic-inch V-8 to power its Galaxie 500 XL. In 1963 the top G-code version of the engine put out 405 horsepower. Photo by Tom Glatch.

When Ford got serious about its Total Performance program, it provided drag racers with a hot 406-cubic-inch V-8 to power its Galaxie 500 XL.

In1963 the top G-code version of the engine put out 405 horsepower.

Photo by Tom Glatch.

In the 1960s, three incendiary ingredients--developing V-8 engine technology, a culture consumed by the need for speed, and 75 million baby boomers entering the auto market--exploded in the form of the factory muscle car. The resulting vehicles, brutal machines unlike any the world had seen before or will ever see again, defined the sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll generation.

The home-built hot rod was the first distinctly American expression of a performance automobile. Archives/TEN: The Enthusiast Network Magazines, LLC.

The home-built hot rod was the first distinctly American expression of a performance automobile.

Archives/TEN: The Enthusiast Network Magazines, LLC.

American Muscle Cars chronicles this tumultuous period of American history through the primary tool Americans use to define themselves: their automobiles. From the street-racing hotrod culture that emerged following World War II through the new breed of muscle cars still emerging from Detroit today, this book brings to life the history of the American muscle car.

Not wanting to produce a Camaro clone, Pontiac took extra time to design its version of GM’s F-body platform.

Not wanting to produce a Camaro clone, Pontiac took extra time to design its version of GM’s F-body platform.